Chair Support. Is there anything available to hold you upright in your wheelchair? — Scope | Disability forum
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Chair Support. Is there anything available to hold you upright in your wheelchair?

Gavmar
Gavmar Member Posts: 2 Listener
Hi, mAll.

My father in law has Parkinson's and has had a mini stroke. When he is in his wheelchair he falls over to the right hand side, is there anything available to hold him upright in the chair. Thank you.

Comments

  • newborn
    newborn Member Posts: 728 Pioneering
     Yes of course, this is a routine situation for many people.  Can you contact whoever provided the wheelchair?
    Others who have the same requirements will no doubt post here with more details.  

    P.S. It is lucky that he has you to research for him. Good on you!
  • Gavmar
    Gavmar Member Posts: 2 Listener
    Hi.
    I bought a motorised Reno elite wheelchair. I love him. He gave me one of the most precious things in my life., my wife.
  • chiarieds
    chiarieds Community Co-Production Group Posts: 10,996 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Gavmar - & welcome to the community. I would suggest you contact an occupational therapist to see what they might come up with. There are lateral supports such as in the following link, but I couldn't see a price. Please see: https://www.qbitus.co.uk/products/lateral-support-system/     I saw other lateral supports, but I don't think they'd attach to the wheelchair.

  • WPM
    WPM Member Posts: 5 Listener
    @Gavmar with those 2 diagnosis your FIL should meet the NHS criteria for a detail assessment and provision of supportive wheelchair to meet his changing needs
    Especially with Parkinson’s they re-assess as and when needed and  change equipment on wheelchair. 
    Do expect a waiting list though. 

    He’s lucky to have you :)

    All the best. 
  • zebragal
    zebragal Member Posts: 11 Listener
    I would like to know if there is a similar thing for general chair and my arm chair, as have poor core control and always lean to the side when i am sitting and need to have help to sit straight but my OT was awful and not helpful at all 
  • Alex_Scope
    Alex_Scope Posts: 166

    Scope community team

    @zebragal I'm sorry to hear your OT was less than helpful, that is disheartening. I have similar poor core control myself, and tend to lean to the left.

    I've not yet invested in any proper aids or equipment to counteract this in armchairs other than a lot of cushions. That and shifting my posture as regularly as I remember. Clearwell Mobility might be a good place to start, though their back supports don't offer a huge amount of choice. I wonder if those supports I've seen in cars might be worth looking into as well?

    Please do let us know if we can be of any further help.

    @Gavmar did you have any luck with your father in law? :)
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  • JustPete
    JustPete Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 49 Connected
    @Gavmar I am reluctant to make any suggestions on manufacturer or type of support.  I have tried so many down the years.  @WPM is correct in saying your father-in-law should meet criteria to be assessed and then the 'correct' equipment provided.  Also, as @WPM says his needs will change, and it really is trial and error.

    I think the best use of your time and effort will be directed in getting your FIL on and up the list to be assessed.  If you need assistance on how to get in touch with the correct people please let us know.

    All the very best!
    I am a Scope Volunteer.   I have knowledge about life! Additionally, but not limited to: living with a disability, employing personal assistants (requiring 24x7 care), education (having reached PhD level), sexuality (being gay) managing relationships having a disability (tricky), technology and assistive technology (being a geek), sport & leisure (being a Paralympian and on various committees whose purpose is to maximise inclusion at all levels), mental health (both through personal experience and supporting others), Arsenal Football Club (a necessary part of life).  If I can't help, I will endeavour to find somebody who can.

    "You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, smarter than you think and loved more than you'll ever know." - Winnie The Pooh
  • JustPete
    JustPete Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 49 Connected
    @zebragal I would not leave the matter of your 'OT being awful' there!  OT's are not supposed to be awful and are there to give help & advice.

    If I were in your situation (as I have been more times than I care to remember) I would:
    1. Write down the ways in which your OT  was "awful and not helpful at all"
    2. Write down the issues you need resolving.
    3. Contact the relevant agency who put you in contact with your OT (it might be a Social Worker or Adult Care Services).  It might be your OT directly.
    4. Explain the unresolved issue.
    5. Give them an opportunity to fix the issue.

    It is important to begin from a viewpoint that the "professionals" do want to help.  It is important to give them the opportunity to fix something they have missed.  If they do not, then you need to take a different approach.

    I have been in many scraps with Professionals!  I have learned that taking a deep breath, giving them the opportunity to fix matters, is the best first step!

    It is exhausting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I am a Scope Volunteer.   I have knowledge about life! Additionally, but not limited to: living with a disability, employing personal assistants (requiring 24x7 care), education (having reached PhD level), sexuality (being gay) managing relationships having a disability (tricky), technology and assistive technology (being a geek), sport & leisure (being a Paralympian and on various committees whose purpose is to maximise inclusion at all levels), mental health (both through personal experience and supporting others), Arsenal Football Club (a necessary part of life).  If I can't help, I will endeavour to find somebody who can.

    "You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, smarter than you think and loved more than you'll ever know." - Winnie The Pooh
  • zebragal
    zebragal Member Posts: 11 Listener
    JustPete said:
    @zebragal I would not leave the matter of your 'OT being awful' there!  OT's are not supposed to be awful and are there to give help & advice.

    If I were in your situation (as I have been more times than I care to remember) I would:
    1. Write down the ways in which your OT  was "awful and not helpful at all"
    2. Write down the issues you need resolving.
    3. Contact the relevant agency who put you in contact with your OT (it might be a Social Worker or Adult Care Services).  It might be your OT directly.
    4. Explain the unresolved issue.
    5. Give them an opportunity to fix the issue.

    It is important to begin from a viewpoint that the "professionals" do want to help.  It is important to give them the opportunity to fix something they have missed.  If they do not, then you need to take a different approach.

    I have been in many scraps with Professionals!  I have learned that taking a deep breath, giving them the opportunity to fix matters, is the best first step!

    It is exhausting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I had to put in a complaint, in the hope that the department will fix, don't know if just had a bad OT. I am aware that they are not all bad, I am sure there are great ones out there, but this one did not want to help. She refused basic access to help with any of my needs, and still tried to claim that front door was accessible even though she measured the door and the wheelchair and that was just some of it and I gave her many chances to fix it 

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