Pip & mental health. Can I ask the assessor to read back what they write on my form? — Scope | Disability forum
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Pip & mental health. Can I ask the assessor to read back what they write on my form?

Tiggy1
Tiggy1 Member Posts: 5 Listener
edited September 27 in PIP, DLA, and AA
I struggle to remember things and get easily confused am i allowed to ask the assessor to read back  what they write on my form so i can be sure they get the full picture 

Comments

  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 334 Pioneering
    edited September 27
    Hi @Tiggy1

    Thanks for reaching out to us. You are able to request reasonable adjustments for your PIP assessment under the Equality Act (2010). If you wish to have a read-aloud then this may be a reasonable adjustment you request. You may also take someone with you to your assessment. There are other reasonable adjustments that you may find useful. If you are interested in exploring these then you may find https://www.scope.org.uk/advice-and-support/preparing-for-pip-assessment/ useful. This link provides more examples of reasonable adjustments and details about how you could request reasonable adjustments if you require them. If there is anything else we can do to support you, please do not hesitate to let us know  :) 
    I have expertise in the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • chiarieds
    chiarieds Community Co-Production Group Posts: 10,579 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Tiggy1 - & welcome to the community. I would tend to disagree. Whilst you can ask the assessor to read back what they've written, I doubt there would be time to do so, Remember also that the assessor will listen to your replies, then they will write down their own opinion. I would suggest if there are any questions that you feel confused about, do ask them to repeat them, or ask them to put it another way. Let them know if you're struggling to answer. Good luck.
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 334 Pioneering
    Thanks, @chiarieds for the more practical insights and support! Though, it still may be worth requesting. The worst that can happen is that they say no but they will definitely say no if they are not aware it is something you need  :)
    I have expertise in the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,843 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,
    I agree with @chiarieds here. There's no harm in asking for the HCP to read out what they've put but they don't have to agree to this. I also can't see how this could be seen as a reasonable adjustment. They are not there to write what you say word for word.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,508 Disability Gamechanger
    As per the above. If it were a face to face and they wanted you to sign off on the section where you speak and they record as they used to then yes fair enough.

    As it is there's no element of a reasonable adjustment here as those are intended to level the playing field. In this instance the playing field is already level i.e. no claimant gets to know whether the HCP has understood the impact of their conditions on their ability to perform points scoring activities unless they request a copy of the report subsequently. 
  • Tiggy1
    Tiggy1 Member Posts: 5 Listener
    Oh i see, i did not know i could request a copy, thankyou for answering my question 
  • Tiggy1
    Tiggy1 Member Posts: 5 Listener
    Thankyou also for letting me join the forum 
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,843 Disability Gamechanger
    Tiggy1 said:
    Oh i see, i did not know i could request a copy, thankyou for answering my question 

    Yes you can but if you already suffer with mental health it may not be a good idea to request it because it can cause a lot of people even more anxiety, especially if it's not what you expected.
  • Tiggy1
    Tiggy1 Member Posts: 5 Listener
    Yes i spoke to my support worker she recommended i don't ask for it as she is hoping to be with me at the assessmen, thankyou poppy123456 
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 334 Pioneering
    Hi all! 

    Thanks for supporting one another. I always love to see the support you provide for one another within the Scope community. As you rightly identified @mikehughescq, reasonable adjustments are for creating a level playing field. In terms of how a read-aloud could be a reasonable adjustment, if you have difficulties remembering and being confused, the assessor may not read out how much you have scored but may read out your responses to remind you about and clarify what you have already said and whether you would like to add any additional information. I hope this helps to clear up my thinking process! However, you could also take someone with you to clarify whether the information you have provided is accurate for you and remind you if there is anything you should add. If you have any more questions, please do not hesitate to ask  :)
    I have expertise in the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,843 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi all! 

    Thanks for supporting one another. I always love to see the support you provide for one another within the Scope community. As you rightly identified @mikehughescq, reasonable adjustments are for creating a level playing field. In terms of how a read-aloud could be a reasonable adjustment, if you have difficulties remembering and being confused, the assessor may not read out how much you have scored but may read out your responses to remind you about and clarify what you have already said and whether you would like to add any additional information. I hope this helps to clear up my thinking process! However, you could also take someone with you to clarify whether the information you have provided is accurate for you and remind you if there is anything you should add. If you have any more questions, please do not hesitate to ask  :)

    Sorry but again i have to diagree. The HCP is not there to write what you say word for word so there's no reasonable adjustments to make. They also can't read out how much a person may have socred because the HCP doesn't score them any points, they make recommendations. Only a decision maker can score the points.
  • Tiggy1
    Tiggy1 Member Posts: 5 Listener
    L volunteer yes i was wanting more of a clarification on what i had said not what points i would be awarded, this is a first time claim so i just need a bit of clarity, but as i say i spoke to my support worker and all is sorted now thankyou for all replies 
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,508 Disability Gamechanger
    Yup, I’m with @poppy123456 100% here. There is simply no RA to make. A person who is not confused or have memory issues may just as easily screw up an answer. They would not be afforded the opportunity to correct anything. Any attempt to claim this as an RA would be legitimately be refused as being not an RA; disproportionate in its impact (as the delays it would introduce for others would cancel multiple appointments) and so on.
  • chiarieds
    chiarieds Community Co-Production Group Posts: 10,579 Disability Gamechanger
    edited September 28
    Hi @Tiggy1 - it's good your support worker is hoping to be with you for your assessment; I'm sure that will be helpful.
    @L_Volunteer - not to belabour the point, &, altho I didn't say it (not wanting to say too much at once, & trying to be diplomatic), this wouldn't be considered a reasonable adjustment.
    Can you imagine the logistic problems that would ensue if claimants started doing this? Assessments taking longer; waits for an assessment therefore taking even longer, & the wait for an assessment can be many months already.....
    Btw, Mike has asked not to be tagged; he will answer as & when he can, & where he feels it appropriate.
    Edit: Sorry, Mike, was typing at the same time as yourself.
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 334 Pioneering
    Hi all, 

    As always, thanks for supporting each other the best you can. It is always great to see the support within Scope's online community. However, as you have all rightly identified, this is not my area of expertise. All I can do is signpost you to https://www.scope.org.uk/advice-and-support/preparing-for-pip-assessment/?_ga=2.13923063.1132981798.1632938220-203648702.1588053496&_gac=1.183304020.1632316046.Cj0KCQjwqKuKBhCxARIsACf4XuEFHRjekAq2KSFp5A2yJFK6MRhLUxkm5Y1dOZ8dxHku7yuUG8trtIEaAskcEALw_wcB which discusses the same information I have shared with you. I wish you the best of luck with this @Tiggy1. If you have any more questions, please do not hesitate to reach out again  :)
    I have expertise in the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,508 Disability Gamechanger
    I would say there are significant elements of that page which are simply not accurate.
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 334 Pioneering
    Hi @mikehughescq

    Thanks for informing me about this. I will get the link flagged for you. We are always striving to provide the most accurate support we can  :)
    I have expertise in the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 6,030

    Scope community team

    Please feel free to send any feedback you have on the page over to [email protected] and we can look at passing that onto our content team @mikehughescq :)
    Online Community Coordinator, she/her

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  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,508 Disability Gamechanger
    Not really got the time @Tori_Scope and not my role. If Scope want to publish stuff like this then the onus is on them to ensure it is accurate and remains so... but start with stuff like "You can ask for a recording of your telephone assessment. This may be useful if you need to appeal."

    Appeal is the second challenge. So why does it not reference "useful if you need to do a mandatory reconsideration or an appeal"? 

    Then we have the fact that none of this explains just how difficult it is to set up a recording and the many barriers to that, including the HCP declining to be recorded for example. 

    Then we have the practical fact that your recording actually probably isn't much use given that DWP don't have the equipment immediately to hand to listen to it at the decision or MR stage and the problems posed by such things for HMCTS are well documented. 

    I could go on but you get the gist. 

    The RA page referenced is useless. It literally lists examples no adjustments in relation to the benefit system.  
  • onebigvoice
    onebigvoice Posts: 184 Courageous
    Hi all! 

    Thanks for supporting one another. I always love to see the support you provide for one another within the Scope community. As you rightly identified @mikehughescq, reasonable adjustments are for creating a level playing field. In terms of how a read-aloud could be a reasonable adjustment, if you have difficulties remembering and being confused, the assessor may not read out how much you have scored but may read out your responses to remind you about and clarify what you have already said and whether you would like to add any additional information. I hope this helps to clear up my thinking process! However, you could also take someone with you to clarify whether the information you have provided is accurate for you and remind you if there is anything you should add. If you have any more questions, please do not hesitate to ask  :)

    Sorry but again i have to diagree. The HCP is not there to write what you say word for word so there's no reasonable adjustments to make. They also can't read out how much a person may have socred because the HCP doesn't score them any points, they make recommendations. Only a decision maker can score the points.
      I have asked for a copy of the report from the assessor and the first thing they say is the report is not for you its for the decision maker, if you want a copy of th report you have to ask them for the report.
      This is why the report written by the assessor is only an opinion.  Since the report when the decision maker uses it has to show ALL supporting evidence they used to come to that decision, including the points given to each descriptor.
      The only problem is the " assessors " are hired by the secretary o state to write a report about you if the decision makersfeels that he does not understand information you have supplied either medical or in support letters about your claim.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,508 Disability Gamechanger
    There is a near total disconnect between the quote you have inserted and your statement below it. Thus it is unclear what point you’re trying to make. I think pretty much everyone on the forum is well aware that the HCP is expressing an opinion at this point in time. 

    The rest of what you say once again makes no sense. The fact that the report is for the DM not claimants has nothing to do with whether it’s an opinion or not. 

    Nor are HCPs hired by the Secretary of State. DWP contract with APs through a procurement process. The contracted AP then employ the HCPs. Zero connection to the Secretary of State. 

    Finally the HCPs are not in place to report if the DM “feels that he does not understand information you have supplied”. That is wholly inaccurate. The report takes place in the majority of claims before a DM is even aware the claim exists.

    Is it possible your post could include a fact occasionally?

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