Asked to hand my notice in. Is it legal? — Scope | Disability forum
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Asked to hand my notice in. Is it legal?

DiddlyDi
DiddlyDi Member Posts: 2 Listener
edited October 22 in Work and employment
I have Parkinson's disease and have been working for 3 years for a large pastoral organisation in the UK.I really love my job and they knew at the time of recruiting me that i had parkinsons and took me on anyway. They have been really accommodating about giving me flexibilty to be able to continue in my role despite the Parkinson's progressing.  Earlier this year i had a heart attack and everything started to fall apart from thereon in.  I was working from home and found it really difficult to discipline myself to working time/home time and i couldn't seem to managed the juggling of all the tasks for my job (which i would add is hard enough to manage when i was feeling well let alone feeling ill. The job is clearly full time but the organisation profess not to be able to afford to employ someone full time and try to cover it with part time hours. Needless to say stresss go the better of me and i just couldn;t do the job. My boss visited me at home and asked if i would be happy to resign and because i felt that i really didnt have an option i agreed to resign and handed my notice  in. The thing is i loved that job and now i feel really bereft not to mention £600 a month worse of. My question is should i have expected my employer to support me more?  Given me more time to adjust etc? In the 3 years i  have worked for them i have never had a written contract - is that illegal?

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Comments

  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,595 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @DiddlyDi I'm not going to address the employer issue as it's not something I know much about but someone will hopefully see this who has that knowledge.
    What I would ask is are you claiming PIP ?
    I am a person with epilepsy not an epileptic, my illness doesn't define me.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,775 Disability Gamechanger
    So no conversations about reasonable adjustments, flexible working, a career break?
  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 12,730 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi and welcome to the community 

    It isn't illegal to not have a written contract but it is best practice and would be frowned upon,  however did you ever ask for one ? A contract can be verbal 

    Some companies have a blanket terms and conditions of employment and this should be available for employees in a handbook or policy 

    You should not have resigned but have gone through the company oh referral for assessments on recommendation for reasonable adjustments or possible medical dismissal 



     
    I have professional experience in HR within public,  private, and charity sectors.  If I can help I will 
  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,595 Disability Gamechanger
    @janer1967 one of the best jobs I ever had and did for over five years never had a written contract.
    I am a person with epilepsy not an epileptic, my illness doesn't define me.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,775 Disability Gamechanger
    Important to remember that everyone who has employee status does have a contract but it may not be in writing. I don’t see that it has any relevance here though.
  • DiddlyDi
    DiddlyDi Member Posts: 2 Listener
    Thanks for your comments. In answer yes I am getting PIP.  I did ask for a contract of emp but not forthcoming. They have been very flexible and accommodating letting me work from home and vary my hours as I could manage. It's a very large organisation that you would imagine have policies for everything (think of where some people go on a Sunday morning....). I don't want to cause bad feeling but I suppose I feel a little hard done by having given  them an easy way out  of the situation. I should have spent some time considering  options..

  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 12,730 Disability Gamechanger
    If you do work and are paid for that work then you have a contract but as above this isn't relevant in this scenario, however in a large company I would expect they would

    As they have been OK with you in the past it maybe just down to the person who suggested to resign did not know of any other options not that this is an excuse they could have found out

    Or maybe thought the suggestion was taking away the pressure from you having to worry about work

    I agree you should have given this more thought 

    How long is it since you left 
    I have professional experience in HR within public,  private, and charity sectors.  If I can help I will 

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