PIP, DLA and AA
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PIP and autism

paulamarie1222paulamarie1222 Member Posts: 13 Connected
Hi everyone. My son is 22. Diagnosed with autism, speech and language delay at aged 3. Had DLA and then awarded PIP when he was 16. Had to reapply in 2018 and came back with 0 points. Appealed with DWP and still came back with 0.
Went to tribunal earlier this month but didn’t take my son as he would get too anxious. Tribunal has been adjourned because they want to question George.
Have been advised to get a letter from GP stating the adverse affects of his disabilities in daily life.
GP said that they can only do a cover letter saying that his condition is life long and they would just make a reference to my evidence. My evidence  highlights situations that cause him psychological distress, also the fact that he is at risk from financial abuse, sexual abuse, frauds and scams and stranger danger etc etc. I have told GP that my evidence holds no weight for Tribunal and DWP and that if this was stated in a letter by a medical professional, this would have the impact needed for my son’s case.
The GP says that basically because the DWP PIP have changed the criteria, George no longer meets their criteria and they are implicating that i
I’m so frustrated and at a loss. Any advise would be extremely welcome as I’m swimming against the tide and getting no where!

Replies

  • paulamarie1222paulamarie1222 Member Posts: 13 Connected
    Sorry. My post should say that he was awarded DLA at the age of 3.
  • wilkowilko Member Posts: 2,401 Disability Gamechanger
    Hello, DLA and PIP are two different benefits and the criteria for each benefit is different. You may have to take your son to the tribunal to be seen and possibly questioned about his understanding and abilities, this could be the only way your so may or could be awarded PIP. The tribunal panel have to follow the letter of the law in how a person meets the criteria for each of the PIP descriptors. If an award where to be granted the DWP will have 30 days to appeal if they think they have good reason to.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,173 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,

    Your GP telling you that the criteria for PIP has changed is not exactly correct. The only activity that's changed for PIP is the following and planning a journey, all other activities are exactly the same.

    A GP will very rarely know how a person's conditions affect then against the PIP descriptors, which is why his GP has said they can only do a cover letter saying that his condition is life long and they would just make a reference to your evidence. A letter from a GP carries very little weight to be honest.

    You said your evidence highlights situations that cause him psychological distress, also the fact that he is at risk from financial abuse, sexual abuse, frauds and scams and stranger danger BUT have you stated where and why you think he should have scored those points? Have you given real life examples of what happened the last time he attempted that activity for each descriptor that applies to him?

    Are you your son's appointee? Even with you being his appointee sometimes the panel are unable to make a decision without the claimant being their in person because they always prefer to see the claimant to see exactly how their conditions affect them.

    May i ask if you've got expert advice regarding this from an agency near you?  Have a look at this link to see what's local to you for that advice. https://advicelocal.uk/



    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • paulamarie1222paulamarie1222 Member Posts: 13 Connected
    Hi, Thanks for replying. 
    Yes I’m his appointee. I have given an example to back my evidence plus something else has happened since too. I was thinking about sending the doctor some medically recognised info on how autism condition impacts on daily life to go into george’s patient record so this would give the GP more to include in a letter? My thinking is that if the info has come from a proven official source, then it’s not just me saying it (if that makes sense?) I’m giving into the fact that I’ll have to take George with me but he’s not going to be a happy bunny!    
    I really appreciate your advice and insight into this. Thank you
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,173 Disability Gamechanger
    You need to give examples for each descriptor that applies. Sending his GP medically recognised info isn't going to help your son's PIP claim because PIP isn't awarded based on any diagnosis, it's how those conditions affect your ability to carry out daily activity based on the PIP descriptors.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • paulamarie1222paulamarie1222 Member Posts: 13 Connected
    Ok. Thank you. I have been looking into this more in depth and it is hit and miss with GPs that will and wont do letters. Fingers crossed for tomorrow but I don't think I'll get any further.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,173 Disability Gamechanger
    I letter from a GP will carry very little weight because they just don't know enough about a patient and how their conditions affect them. If they do agree they will most likely charge you. Those examples will carry more weight than a letter like this.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 987 Disability Gamechanger
    @paulamarie1222 - I tend to agree with Poppy; you're better providing your own evidence rather than relying on a GP (unless he/she knows you very well)

    Didn't you say that your GP said that you didn't qualify for PIP anyway ??
  • paulamarie1222paulamarie1222 Member Posts: 13 Connected
    No. He said that the PIP criteria has changed (he thinks) but the only thing that has is the part about planning a journey. Its common place for people who have life long conditions, to go to tribunal after being awarded 0 points, even though they have submitted the same evidence. My son is deffinately entitled. Its just a case of battling through. They hope that we give up so they can fullfill their targets of cutting back.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,173 Disability Gamechanger
    I disagree that it's common for those with life long conditions to have to take a decision to Tribunal. Lots of people claim PIP because of a life long conditions and how they are affected. Myself and my daughter are 2 of them and we've never had any problems claiming PIP and never been to a Tribunal.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • paulamarie1222paulamarie1222 Member Posts: 13 Connected

    Disability benefit spending reduced by £5 billion over the last decade

    24 September 2018

    Figures obtained by Frank Field MP show that the amount spent on disabled people’s benefits has shrunk by £5 billion following a decade of austerity and cuts.

  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 23,173 Disability Gamechanger
    I think you should concentrate on those real life examples for each descriptor that applies to him, rather than worry about anything else.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
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