Resignation from permitted work and SSP — Scope | Disability forum

Resignation from permitted work and SSP

LadyL
LadyL Member Posts: 46 Connected
Hi,

I hope someone can help me. :/ I am in.the ESA support group and have been doing permitted work of 9 hours. Due to my mental health and severe anxiety because of Covid I have handed in my resignation as I do not feel able to return to my workplace at this time. I had been working from home up until now.

On my mum's recommendation, I sent in a self-certification sickness note for the first 7 days as I didn't think I could use my A/L since the new A/L only started in April. Following that, I am hoping to see my GP to support me so I do not have to work my notice period due to being not mentally well enough to cope with returning to that environment. 😓

However, right now I am freaking out because I read you are not supposed to get SSP if you are on ESA. I'm really scared this will mess up my old-style ESA and they will force me on to Universal Credit. I just wanted to leave my current permitted work for my sanity. 😢 I don't care about getting SSP, I just can't go back. 😥 

I have now received confirmation from my manager about accepting my resignation, but she said she will require further fit notes from my GP which is fine.

Think I will let my manager know I do not want SSP as I am not entitled to it as I am in the receipt of ESA. 

Also, that the note was purely to let her know I am not fit enough to return to work my notice due to my health.

I hope this is the right way to go about it. :/
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Comments

  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 3,407 Disability Gamechanger
    edited June 2
    Unless you were earning more than £120/week you will not be entitled to SSP.
    If you were earning more than £120/week you will be entitled to SSP and your employer is legally required to pay it - unless you resign your job and they accept your immediate resignation.
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • LadyL
    LadyL Member Posts: 46 Connected
    edited June 2
    @calcotti Thank you for your quick reply.
    calcotti said:
    Unless you were earning more than £120/week you will not be entitled to SSP.
    If you were earning more than £120/week you will be entitled to SSP and your employer is legally required to pay it - unless you resign your job and they accept your immediate resignation.
    I earn £90.67 per week from my permitted work, so it is less, but... I am still not quite sure what that will mean. 😑
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 3,407 Disability Gamechanger
    edited June 2
    LadyL said:
    @calcotti Thank you for your quick reply.
    calcotti said:
    Unless you were earning more than £120/week you will not be entitled to SSP.
    If you were earning more than £120/week you will be entitled to SSP and your employer is legally required to pay it - unless you resign your job and they accept your immediate resignation.
    I earn £90.67 per week from my permitted work, but... I am still not quite sure what that will mean. 😑
    It means you are not entitled to SSP so you don't need to worry about it.
    https://www.gov.uk/statutory-sick-pay/eligibility
    To qualify for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) you must:
    • be classed as an employee and have done some work for your employer
    • earn an average of at least £120 per week
    • have been ill or self-isolating for at least 4 days in a row (including non-working days)
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • LadyL
    LadyL Member Posts: 46 Connected
    @calcotti Thank you for your help. I really appreciate it. 

    Does the amount of ESA I get make any difference? I do not have any other income. 

    So, at the risk of sounding stupid, does that mean I don't need to do anything...?  :/
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 3,407 Disability Gamechanger
    LadyL said: Does the amount of ESA I get make any difference? 
    No.
    LadyL said: ..does that mean I don't need to do anything...?  :/
    You should let ESA know that you have stopped the work.
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • LadyL
    LadyL Member Posts: 46 Connected
    @calcotti Thank you. 

    I am hoping to find more permitted work as soon as I can. As I can manage for now, but I do need the extra bit of income. :/

    I just need to find something where I am not in contact with too many people at one time.

    Also, I know I will need to fill out a new permitted work form when I do and send it.

    Is there anyway to inform them without phoning them though...? I always feel afraid to contact them and quite intimidated. 😓 I know I am not doing anything wrong, but I never seem to get anyone well-mannered to speak to.  
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 3,407 Disability Gamechanger
    edited June 2
    LadyL said: Is there anyway to inform them without phoning them though...?
    The only other way is to write a letter.
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • LadyL
    LadyL Member Posts: 46 Connected
    @calcotti Thank you again for all your help.

    It will probably be better to just speak to someone then. 

    Would they see stopping and starting permitted work elsewhere as an issue...?

    I'm only leaving my current job because of Covid as my workplace makes it difficult to social distance, which has affected my mental health.

    Sorry for all the questions.
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 3,407 Disability Gamechanger
    LadyL said: Would they see stopping and starting permitted work elsewhere as an issue...? 
    They shouldn't. The whole point of permitted work is to allow people to do some limited work if they are capable of it. As long as the type of work you do does not contradict the reasons you are on ESA it shouldn't be a problem.
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • LadyL
    LadyL Member Posts: 46 Connected
    @calcotti Thank you so much for all your help. 

    You have really helped put my mind at ease. :smile:
    calcotti said:
    LadyL said: Would they see stopping and starting permitted work elsewhere as an issue...? 
    They shouldn't. The whole point of permitted work is to allow people to do some limited work if they are capable of it. As long as the type of work you do does not contradict the reasons you are on ESA it shouldn't be a problem.
    My RA and Fibromyalgia impacts my life every day, and makes working quite difficult. I am usually quite exhausted and sore after the few hours that I have been doing. Despite needing a little more income, my Rheumatologist and GP have both said it is good for me to try and do some limited work. So that I don't feel so isolated and can feel valued.

    Anyway, thanks again. Hope you have a lovely day. 🙂

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