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Guest post: Getting an ASD diagnosis at 46

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  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    But not all the people on this planet, surely, @joannarashelle ? Perhaps too many of those whom one only encounters in passing, and there are always the nasty ones whom one can't always manage or (if necessary) avoid. There must be at least some - more than a few, I hope - who make life better for each of us at times, if not continually.
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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    Hello @DianaW no not all people
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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    Lots on here I have an afiinity towards!

    But humans as a species are baffling to me
  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    I find that life works out much better if I concentrate on the people etc that I need to work with. Better to ignore (as far as possible) the worse possibilities that may be out there than let worrying about them get in the way of the immediate issues. (Much easier said than done nowadays, with a dangerous narcissist in the White House - but that's another matter and much better left in the background.)

    It's rather like watching the pennies and letting the pounds look after themselves, which is always good advice!
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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    Hello @DianaW!

    Wise words indeed but not always easy for those with Autism
  • lonewarrior
    lonewarrior Community member Posts: 23 Connected
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    I haven't been diagnosed, But having suffered so much at school and having to battle the school my daughter attended to get her help which never came I tried to find out what the issues might be. I came to the conclusion it might be dyslexia.or at least in the spectrum of it. We gave her the help she needed to get her to college, they decided to test her for dyslexia and a report came back stating she was indeed dyslexic but had managed to progress much further than she should have? The report author praised us as parents for getting her to her current level. My daughter is now training as a teacher,she has always volunteered for work with disadvantaged children.she can spot the child who needs that extra help. She often posts links to my Facebook timeline to do with dyslexia,autism and other learning areas. I clicked on the post from violetfenn and here I am. As for how I feel about maybe being ASD? I feel as I did when realising I may be dyslexic, relieved and happy,sad,angry and finally at peace that I am not crazy or alone in how I see the world.brian
  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    Hello @DianaW!

    Wise words indeed but not always easy for those with Autism
    That's an interesting comment. How does autism affect one's capacity to adopt someone else's basic philosophies, such as this one, please?
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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    Hello @DianaW
    Maybe One doesn't want to adopt someone else's philosophies maybe One enjoys having their own? 
    I suggest you read up on autism either online or in a library, it will help you 


    Best wishes 
  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    I wasn't suggesting it other than as a potentially helpful strategy, in view of your comment about finding humans baffling as a species.

    I have read what I can find on autism but your comment suggested a depth of understanding that isn't evident in general texts; hence the question. Sorry if that didn't get through clearly.
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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    @DianaW,

    I suspect this specific forum is for support advice compassion and practical help for people with ASD and also their family members and partners. 

     Anyone who posts on here will have a better understanding of autism than in texts, we're living it baby!! For real!!! 

  • pdlglosuk
    pdlglosuk Community member Posts: 1 Listener
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    Hi Violet, So good of you to share your story.  I was diagnosed as having Asperger Syndrome in 1994 following some stressful situations I encountered both in and out of work in the early 1990s.  I was 26 when I was diagnosed and I feel that my current employers are a lot more understanding than some of my previous employers.  I have worked at various Tesco stores since 1995 and have received a lot of support from various organisations such as Gloucestershire Group Homes (a specialist unit for people with AS), Shaw Trust, Pluss and Remploy.  Hope that now you have had your diagnosis that people will be more understanding towards you too.  Such a shame it took so long for you as I feel it makes a huge difference being diagnosed.
  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    @DianaW,

    I suspect this specific forum is for support advice compassion and practical help for people with ASD and also their family members and partners. 

     Anyone who posts on here will have a better understanding of autism than in texts, we're living it baby!! For real!!! 

    So it's an exclusive club for those with ASD, in your opinion? How does that help other people to be more understanding about the differences between them and those with ASD, or society to adapt to accommodating those differences more appropriately?

    We all live in a very mixed society and each of us probably knows people who differ from them in this respect, as well as in others. That's why I originally looked at this discussion, after all: I have a very old friend who's unwittingly on the ASD spectrum and have encountered various others over the years. Surely it would only be beneficial if this forum were as inclusive as possible?
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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    Good morning @DianaW how are you,
    I think you've lost the point of this thread

    its for people such as myself to share their experiences with present and past diagnosis of ASD and to help and possibly inform empower and help each other, in a 'safe' place.
    For assistance and understanding in what can be a complex condition to live with.

    I suggest you address your questions to the Scope advisors?

    They're here to help you and people like you 

    I am not all knowing but hope I've helped you in some way!

    Best of luck 

    xxx
  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    I haven't lost the point of the recent part of this thread at all - but you evidently don't think my point of view worth considering.
    The more exclusive the forum is about who can join in, the less it will help us all to communicate effectively with one another, whether or not we are actually on the ASD spectrum. I hope that's not what Scope had in mind when it began the discussion and invited all Scope members to consider taking part in it.
  • Chris_Alumni
    Chris_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 689 Pioneering
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    Hi Diana, welcome to the community. Everyone is welcome here and we encourage people of all experiences and viewpoints. This thread is however focused on diagnoses of ASD, and we do have many other categories for discussion on other topics related to disability, which you can find here. While everyone is welcome to take part in all discussions across the forum, we have also tried to create spaces where specific situations and conditions can be discussed. Hope this helps, you can also view our community guidelines here.
  • joannarashelle
    joannarashelle Community member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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  • Sam_Alumni
    Sam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,665 Disability Gamechanger
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    Hi @DianaW I think this post is wonderful for sparking debate! As with any debate around a person's impairment or disability, it is important to be sensitive and to listen to the perspectives and experiences of the people who have that diagnosis themselves. 

    What is your question? I am sure there are members to give you their experiences.

    Is it this? 
    "I find that life works out much better if I concentrate on the people etc that I need to work with. Better to ignore (as far as possible) the worse possibilities that may be out there than let worrying about them get in the way of the immediate issues."

    @joannarashelle replied "
    Wise words indeed but not always easy for those with Autism"

    And you said 
    "How does autism affect one's capacity to adopt someone else's basic philosophies, such as this one, please?"
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • DianaW
    DianaW Community member Posts: 30 Connected
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    Yes, that's the essence of it, Sam. It began and proceeded a little earlier and later on, though, running from joannarashelle's comment about "humans as a species are baffling to me" and continuing to her "Maybe One doesn't want to adopt someone else's philosophies maybe One enjoys having heir own?"
    That was where the exchange potentially became so interesting, because each of us seemingly found the other's reaction inexplicable.

    Could you possibly copy the whole exchange over to the new thread, where someone has just asked me to recap how the idea for that emerged. I don't think that I can do this unaided - sorry! Thanks....
  • Chris_Alumni
    Chris_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 689 Pioneering
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    Katy on Facebook says:

    "I was diagnosed at the age of 31 in 2015 as having Asperger's/ASD. This is after being referred when I was 22, seeing a psychologist when I was 23, then hearing nothing until I was 25 and got told I could have a social worker. Only problem with that was that this came when I'd moved to Wales for Uni!

    I then saw a psychologist in Wales during my final year for assessment. She did the children's assessment, then told me that I was wasting her time. I think she said this because I was: a) female, b) engaged (now married), and c) reading Psychology! This is despite my dissertation supervisor - an expert in ASD - saying that if she was a clinician, she would diagnose me then and there as autistic.

    Once I'd graduated, I moved back to Yorkshire, where I summoned the courage to ask for another assessment. This time, it was done properly - DISCO method used, Mum interviewed about what I was like as a child, the works. Three hours later, I had an official diagnosis.

    Trouble is, there's very little help out there for adults on the spectrum. Most of the help seems to be for kids."
  • Chris_Alumni
    Chris_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 689 Pioneering
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    Another comment from Facebook, this one from Sarah:
    "I was diagnosed aged 20 after many years fighting to be assessed. I've been told Autism is more unheard of in women than it is men. I think an effort should be made to spread awareness for both male and female autism as a whole because i think it affects men and women in different ways but i may be wrong. 

    I find society can be very harsh on people with autism and I've found when I say I have Autism the response i get is "but you don't look like you do" or another favourite is "you appear so confident though" social interaction with people is incredibly difficult for me, I can only communicate best with animals or children to my surprise. 

    I hope to study Inclusive Education and Disability Studies at university next year and I hope that I can bring my own experiences into mt studies and in my future career."
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